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Christianity’s Criminal History, 166

The butcher of the Saxons While Charles was making his conquests in northern Spain and losing them again—the only defeat suffered by a Frankish army under his command—Widukind, a Westphalian nobleman who had returned from Danish emigration (and who is first named in 777, when he failed to attend the Diet of Paderborn), advanced with…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 165

– For the context of these translations click here –   A mission along ‘military shock lines’ So now the Saxons not only had to answer for their subordination ‘with all their freedom and property’, but the territory of which they were dispossessed was immediately divided, and in the presence of numerous bishops, between the…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 164

The Christian banners enter Saxony Charles’ armies—which in the larger campaigns consisted of just 3,000 horsemen and between 6,000 and 10,000-foot soldiers—sometimes numbered more than 5,000 or 6,000 warriors. Unlike in the time of his grandfather Charles Martell, the core of the army was made up of heavy cavalry. The horsemen were armed with chain…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 163

– For the context of these translations click here –   Plunder and Christianisation, a trump card of Frankish government policy While the Franks had fought in unison with the Saxons in the annihilation of the kingdom of Thuringia in 531, in 555-556 Chlothar I conducted two campaigns against them. In the first he succumbed…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 162

The bloody ‘mission’ of the Saxons (772-804) Desiderius, the last king of the Longobards, went with his wife and daughter, Charles’ ex-wife, to a Frankish prison, then disappeared into a monastery (probably in Corbie), where he still survived for some time. In any case, he disappeared forever. The Longobard kingdom was wiped off the map.…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 161

– For the context of these translations click here – Anti-juridical sovereignty of Charles and the beginning of the pro-pope warfare Shortly before Pope Stephen died at the end of January 772, Carloman had died (after having made large donations to churches and monasteries, and especially to the cathedral of Rheims and the abbey of…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 159

  Charles I, known as the Great or Charlemagne, and the Popes ‘His hair was grey and beautiful, his face radiant and cheerful; his appearance was always imposing and dignified; his health always magnificent’. ‘The Christian religion, in which he was instructed from a young age, he always cultivated with great sanctity and piety (sanctissime…

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Reflections of an Aryan woman, 71

  Chapter 10 Hitlerian esotericism & the tradition ‘The fools scorn Me when I take on human form; My essence, supreme source of beings, escapes them.’ —Bhagavad-Gita, 9, verse 2   There were, of course, echelons among the elect. Curiously, the name of this elite of physical health and beauty, of warlike courage and, more…

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The religious roots of anti-Germanism

by Dietrich Schuler Editor’s note: This is the German-English translation of the first article we have published in German at the German section of The West’s Darkest Hour.   ______ 卐 ______   If we try to fathom the special fate of the Germans within the framework of the European tragedy, it is not enough…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 126

For the context of this translation see the previous instalment of this series. Volume 4. Early Middle Ages From King Clovis (ca. 500) to the death of Charles ‘the Great’ (814) ‘For a long time Christ had already taken a look at the Germanic peoples… A new spring dawned on the sky of the Church’.…

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