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Christianity’s Criminal History, 166

The butcher of the Saxons While Charles was making his conquests in northern Spain and losing them again—the only defeat suffered by a Frankish army under his command—Widukind, a Westphalian nobleman who had returned from Danish emigration (and who is first named in 777, when he failed to attend the Diet of Paderborn), advanced with…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 165

– For the context of these translations click here –   A mission along ‘military shock lines’ So now the Saxons not only had to answer for their subordination ‘with all their freedom and property’, but the territory of which they were dispossessed was immediately divided, and in the presence of numerous bishops, between the…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 164

The Christian banners enter Saxony Charles’ armies—which in the larger campaigns consisted of just 3,000 horsemen and between 6,000 and 10,000-foot soldiers—sometimes numbered more than 5,000 or 6,000 warriors. Unlike in the time of his grandfather Charles Martell, the core of the army was made up of heavy cavalry. The horsemen were armed with chain…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 163

– For the context of these translations click here –   Plunder and Christianisation, a trump card of Frankish government policy While the Franks had fought in unison with the Saxons in the annihilation of the kingdom of Thuringia in 531, in 555-556 Chlothar I conducted two campaigns against them. In the first he succumbed…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 162

The bloody ‘mission’ of the Saxons (772-804) Desiderius, the last king of the Longobards, went with his wife and daughter, Charles’ ex-wife, to a Frankish prison, then disappeared into a monastery (probably in Corbie), where he still survived for some time. In any case, he disappeared forever. The Longobard kingdom was wiped off the map.…

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‘You must learn…!’

by Gaedhal I think that Richard Dawkins has been criticized in some quarters for calling religion a ‘memetic virus’. However, for me, it is a good analogy. Comparing a religion like evangelical Christianity to a virus is a good metaphor. Are there perhaps places where the metaphor breaks down? Perhaps. However, this is true of…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 159

  Charles I, known as the Great or Charlemagne, and the Popes ‘His hair was grey and beautiful, his face radiant and cheerful; his appearance was always imposing and dignified; his health always magnificent’. ‘The Christian religion, in which he was instructed from a young age, he always cultivated with great sanctity and piety (sanctissime…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 158

– For the context of these translations click here –   A month after Charles Martel died, in December 741 Gregory III, the last Roman bishop to be confirmed by the Emperor of Byzantium, also died. His successor was Zacharias (741-752). Liutprand died at the beginning of 744, after thirty-twoyears of rule. Before the death…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 155

– For the context of these translations click here – The dispute over images begins If we are well-informed about the 6th century of Byzantine history, thanks especially to the detailed descriptions of the historian Procopius, the 7th and 8th centuries remain in great obscurity. Only the chronicles of two theologians, both defenders of images…

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Evil Christians

In his yesterday correspondence, Gaedhal said: ‘There is a certain class of sicko who, the eviler they find out the god of the Bible to be, then the more they love him. This is true of Calvinist extremists. The Calvinist-extremist god is the evilest being ever dreamt up in the fevered mind of a theologian,…

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