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Christianity’s Criminal History, 169

Charlemagne’s bloody laws During his struggle, the king issued draconian laws, evidently whenever he believed that he had finally subdued the Saxons and could bring them to ‘order.’ Notable in this respect are the Capitulatio departibus Saxoniae (782) and the Capitulare Saxonicum (797). And as conversions to Christianity were forced by mass baptisms, while the…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 168

Frankish expansion from 481 to 814   Last uprisings, war of annihilation and ‘the serene height of the staff’ The war of the Saxons, which lasted for more than ten years, didn’t, however, affect the foreign sovereignty of the Franks, or even Christianity as such. Rather, it was directed primarily against their representatives and institutions,…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 167

Editor’s note: Above, Widukind, the leader of the Saxons from 777 to 785 and worshiper of Aryan Gods, during the Saxon Wars. Alas, Charlemagne, a worshiper of the god of the Jews, ultimately prevailed. For the context of these translations click here.   ______ 卐 ______   The resistance of ‘the most heathen’ against Christianity…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 166

The butcher of the Saxons While Charles was making his conquests in northern Spain and losing them again—the only defeat suffered by a Frankish army under his command—Widukind, a Westphalian nobleman who had returned from Danish emigration (and who is first named in 777, when he failed to attend the Diet of Paderborn), advanced with…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 165

– For the context of these translations click here –   A mission along ‘military shock lines’ So now the Saxons not only had to answer for their subordination ‘with all their freedom and property’, but the territory of which they were dispossessed was immediately divided, and in the presence of numerous bishops, between the…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 164

The Christian banners enter Saxony Charles’ armies—which in the larger campaigns consisted of just 3,000 horsemen and between 6,000 and 10,000-foot soldiers—sometimes numbered more than 5,000 or 6,000 warriors. Unlike in the time of his grandfather Charles Martell, the core of the army was made up of heavy cavalry. The horsemen were armed with chain…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 163

– For the context of these translations click here –   Plunder and Christianisation, a trump card of Frankish government policy While the Franks had fought in unison with the Saxons in the annihilation of the kingdom of Thuringia in 531, in 555-556 Chlothar I conducted two campaigns against them. In the first he succumbed…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 153

– For the context of these translations click here –  The beatissimus dominus took care of women of ‘the tribe of the Angles’. His kinswoman Leoba, a whole generation younger than himself, he appointed abbess in the see of the archbishopric; Thecla, a relative of Leoba, he made abbess of Vitzingen and Ochsenfurt-on-the-Main. And all…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 151

– For the context of these translations click here –   In 718 Charles Martell (depicted left in the French book Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum) ravaged Saxony as far as the Weser and in the same or the following year defeated a detachment at Soissons under the command of the steward Raganfred and Duke Eudo of…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 150

  For the context of these translations click here The Ascension of the Carolingians   ‘…with the help of Christ, King of kings and Lord of lords.’ – Chronicle of Fredegar ‘Soon the Franks attacked with ships and darts, riddled them in the waters and killed them. Thus the Franks finally triumphed over their enemies…

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