web analytics

I’ve changed my mind

I had said that the revised edition of the first volume of our abridged translation of Karlheinz Deschner’s criminal history of Christianity would cover the origins of Judeo-Christianity up to Charlemagne. Now that I have just finished proofreading up to the time of Emperor Justinian of Constantinople, I realised that it is better to finish…

Continue reading

Kriminalgeschichte 2022!

  EDITOR’S FOREWORD [pages 5-8 of the forthcoming Edition] In his after-dinner conversations Hitler said: ‘Christianity is the greatest regression humanity has ever experienced: The Jew has thrown back humanity one and a half thousand years’. And the Romanian philosopher Emil Cioran, who once described himself as a Hitlerist, wrote: ‘The whole world has forgiven…

Continue reading

Christianity’s Criminal History, 172

Constantine I (also Saint Constantine or Constantine the Great) was a Roman emperor from 306 to 337 c.e.   Karlheinz Deschner responds to Prof. Maria R.-Alföldi’s review Mrs Alföldi reviews and censures in just twelve pages (148-159), and under the title ,,Kaiser Konstantin: ein Grosser der Geschichte?”, the seventy-two pages of my chapter ‘Saint Constantine,…

Continue reading

Christianity’s Criminal History, 171

  Response given by Hermann Gieselbusch – Reinbek, 23 August 1996 Sachbuchlektorat Rowohlt Verlag –   (Left, Karlheinz Deschner with his editor Hermann Gieselbusch.) After some thirty years of preparation, the first volume of Karlheinz Deschner’s ten-volume Kriminalgeschichte des Christentums (Criminal History of Christianity) appeared in Germany in September 1986. The second volume was published…

Continue reading

Christianity’s Criminal History, 170

Karolus serenissimus augustus a Deo coronatus magnus pacificas (Charles, most serene emperor, great and peaceful emperor, crowned by God). As the beginning of his prolix title already read in 801, that peacemaking Caesar, crowned by God and reigning also per misericordiam Dei (by the mercy of God), the one who from 802 was also called…

Continue reading

Christianity’s Criminal History, 169

Charlemagne’s bloody laws During his struggle, the king issued draconian laws, evidently whenever he believed that he had finally subdued the Saxons and could bring them to ‘order.’ Notable in this respect are the Capitulatio departibus Saxoniae (782) and the Capitulare Saxonicum (797). And as conversions to Christianity were forced by mass baptisms, while the…

Continue reading

Christianity’s Criminal History, 168

Frankish expansion from 481 to 814   Last uprisings, war of annihilation and ‘the serene height of the staff’ The war of the Saxons, which lasted for more than ten years, didn’t, however, affect the foreign sovereignty of the Franks, or even Christianity as such. Rather, it was directed primarily against their representatives and institutions,…

Continue reading

Christianity’s Criminal History, 167

Editor’s note: Above, Widukind, the leader of the Saxons from 777 to 785 and worshiper of Aryan Gods, during the Saxon Wars. Alas, Charlemagne, a worshiper of the god of the Jews, ultimately prevailed. For the context of these translations click here.   ______ 卐 ______   The resistance of ‘the most heathen’ against Christianity…

Continue reading

Christianity’s Criminal History, 166

The butcher of the Saxons While Charles was making his conquests in northern Spain and losing them again—the only defeat suffered by a Frankish army under his command—Widukind, a Westphalian nobleman who had returned from Danish emigration (and who is first named in 777, when he failed to attend the Diet of Paderborn), advanced with…

Continue reading

Christianity’s Criminal History, 165

– For the context of these translations click here –   A mission along ‘military shock lines’ So now the Saxons not only had to answer for their subordination ‘with all their freedom and property’, but the territory of which they were dispossessed was immediately divided, and in the presence of numerous bishops, between the…

Continue reading