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Christianity’s Criminal History, 161

– For the context of these translations click here – Anti-juridical sovereignty of Charles and the beginning of the pro-pope warfare Shortly before Pope Stephen died at the end of January 772, Carloman had died (after having made large donations to churches and monasteries, and especially to the cathedral of Rheims and the abbey of…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 160

– For the context of these translations click here –   Criminal excesses at the papal court with the change of power in the Frankish kingdom Pope Stephen II, who at the decisive moment had generously granted himself the ‘Constantinian Donation’, died on 26 April 757. At his death, he left a considerably large territory,…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 158

– For the context of these translations click here –   A month after Charles Martel died, in December 741 Gregory III, the last Roman bishop to be confirmed by the Emperor of Byzantium, also died. His successor was Zacharias (741-752). Liutprand died at the beginning of 744, after thirty-twoyears of rule. Before the death…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 157

  The formation of the Church-State by wars and pillage ‘But be vigilant, my children, strive earnestly to take part in what we desire! For you know that he who is on the other side will be excluded from eternal life’. —Pope Stephen II ‘The struggle for Christ and the Church is assigned to the…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 152

  St Boniface, ‘Apostle of the Germans’ and of Rome The Greatest Englishman. —Title of an anthology by Timothy Reuter ‘He was an utterly devoted person, one might almost say tender, not a tempestuous personality or a force of nature. A man of utterly pure and lofty idealism’. —Wilhelm Neuss ‘Moreover, any historian—including an atheist—should…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 144

  The fall of Brunhilda and the first peak in the Christianisation of the idea of kingship (Left, pen drawing from the earliest manuscript of the Chronicle of Fredegar which is believed to depict Eusebius and Jerome, 715 AD.) On the death of Childebert II, he was succeeded by his two sons: Theudebert II (595-612)…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 143

  Brunhilda, Chlothar II and Dagobert I or ‘the Christianisation of the idea of king’. ‘… a wild political animal’. —J. Richards referring to Brunhilda. ‘Precisely under this sovereign, as can be clearly demonstrated, the Christianisation of the idea of the king reached one of its first peaks’. —H.H. Anton, concerning Chlothar II. ‘… God…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 142

– For the context of these translations click here –   Catholic Church historians of the 20th century celebrate Pope Gregory as ‘one of the most important pastors among the popes’ (Baus), as ‘one of the most remarkable and cleanest figures on the chair of Peter’ (Seppelt/Schwaiger) and have long seen him occupying a ‘place…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 141

– For the context of these translations click here –   Pope Gregory’s books The triumphs of the abstruse, not to say of foolishness, in no less than thirty-five books, which the author himself described as libri morales and that in the Middle Ages, to which they served as a compendium of morals, were called…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 140

– For the context of these translations click here – (Left, Pope Gregory in the great window at the Church of the Good Shepherd (Rosemont, Pennsylvania).) Modern research attributes to this pope regular studies and very solid instruction, ‘an eminent cultural and moral training’ (RAC XII 1983). However, precise data on Gregory’s scientific culture are…

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