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Day of Wrath, 15

A bitter discussion A quick way to show the Aristotelian phase where present-day history, anthropology and sociology are stuck is by quoting excerpts from a heated debate about psychohistory. To make the reading easier I will omit the use of ellipsis even between long unquoted paragraphs. The complete debate can be read in the Wikipedia…

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Wirsén on Miller’s fans

That the author is secretly smuggling out and reworking, often lying about and numbing, their abusive emotional childhood is something Alice Miller tends to imply when dealing with works of art: a mode of thinking we as her readers easily slip into, isn’t it? That Kafka’s work is basically explainable as an artistic dramatization of…

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Day of Wrath, 14

Psychohistory   Perspective Lloyd deMause has written that his scholarly life brought him to one conclusion: the history of mankind is founded in the abuse of children. His greater finding is that the central force of change in history is not the economy, but the psychogenic changes that occur due to the parental-filial interactions in…

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Day of Wrath, 4

The history of childhood and its Newton John Bowlby advanced the fundamentals for understanding attachment; Colin Ross did the same for mental disorders in human beings, and I will keep his class in mind to explain psychohistory. But Ross is a physician, not an historian. In the following pages I will show the deeper reasons…

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Day of Wrath, 2

The trauma model   Introduction Throughout history and prehistory children’s lives have been a nightmare about which our species is barely starting to become conscious. “Parents are the child’s most lethal enemy,” wrote Lloyd deMause, the founder of psychohistory. While paleo-anthropologists have found evidence of decapitated infants since the time of our pre-human ancestors, and…

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The Yearling, 1

The Yearling is a 1938 classic authored by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (1896-1953); the above is an illustration by Newell Convers Wyeth (1882-1945) of a scene in the novel. Recently I read The Yearling for the very first time in my life—the very same old copy with Wyeth’s moving illustrations that so much inspired me as…

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Ten books that changed my mind

1. Maxfield Parrish Poster Book 2. The Sickle 3. Laing and Anti-Psychiatry 4. Childhood’s End 5. A Skeptic’s Handbook of Parapsychology 6. The Relentless Question 7. Final Analysis 8. The Gulag Archipelago 9. For Your Own Good 10. The Emotional Life of Nations

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Miller and deMause

Or: The ten books that made an impact in my life before I became racially conscious 9.- For Your Own Good by Alice Miller (read in 2002) 10.- The Emotional Life of Nations by Lloyd deMause (read in 2006) In my review of books 5 and 6 I said, “That smart people seem to be…

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Satanic Ritual Abuse

I don’t get Greg Johnson. Yesterday I tried to post the following comment in the most recent piece published at Counter-Currents (CC). The subject? Jewish ritual murders of cute, gentile kids! I’ve not read much about blood libel, speciously called here “Jewish ritual murders,” but I was pretty involved in editing Wikipedia’s Satanic Ritual Abuse…

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Gitone’s magic

My response to Greg Johnson and James O’Meara about the latter’s new book defending homosexuality is available in the addenda to this blog. My article “On classic pederasty” takes issue with them. The Greco-Roman “lover-beloved” institution was not “gay” in the modern sense of the word. An expanded version of “On classic pederasty” was chosen for my collection…

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