web analytics

Reflections of an Aryan woman, 74

One of the earliest epigraphically attested reference to the word arya occurs in the 6th-century b.c.e. Behistun inscription. Moreover, it was not only with the initiates of the Forbidden City of Lhasa (and perhaps with the Dalai Lama himself) that the spiritual elite of the SS Order—which was that of a new traditional civilisation in…

Continue reading

Jesus – triple homonym

The impossibility of speaking with normies about Hitler lies in the fact that the word ‘Hitler’ is, in reality, a double homonym. When we use it we refer to the ‘historical Hitler’ (cf. David Irving’s books). The normie, on the other hand, believes in the ‘Hitler of dogma’: a propaganda figure created by Anglo-Americans and…

Continue reading

Aelia Capitolina

Or: Jew-wise priests vs mere anti-Semites Imagine what would happen if an ethnostate wiped Israel off the map and in the place of Tel-Aviv founded a new city filled with statues depicting the beauty of the Aryan race: a city that Jews would be forbidden to enter. What astronomical levels of resentment would diaspora Jews…

Continue reading

Home

‘Home’ is the second episode of the sixth season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 52nd overall. By now, it should be clear that the show is just a series that stands out from other television series simply because Martin writes well. But it is feminist propaganda of the worst kind:…

Continue reading

Whipping the fog and pride

‘It was as useless to fight against the interpretations of ignorance as to whip the fog’. —George Elliot, Middlemarch Throughout the first decades of my life I was very naive. I believed that it was possible to reason with people simply by citing facts and solid arguments based on those facts. I hadn’t realised that…

Continue reading

Atwill’s cranked-up Jesus

by Richard Carrier Joseph Atwill is one of those crank mythers I often get conflated with. Mythicists like him make the job of serious scholars like me so much harder because people see, hear, or read them and think their nonsense is what mythicism is. They make mythicism look ridiculous. So I have to waste…

Continue reading

Mark transvaluing Homer

Note of the Editor: Those familiar with the critical literature of the New Testament know that there is only one original gospel, that of Mark. Luke and Matthew copied and pasted a bunch of verses from Mark’s gospel to add even more literary fiction from the pen of these two Synoptics (John the Evangelist would…

Continue reading

Merrie Melodies

If we remember a passage in The Fair Race (‘The Arab historian Ibn Fadlan, ambassador of Baghdad to the Bulgarians of the Volga, says of the Vikings: “I have never seen physical specimens so perfect, tall as palm trees, blond and ruddy-skinned”’) it is obvious that the other human races should not exist. If they…

Continue reading

Spanish Renaissance painter

In previous entries of Christian art we have seen how literary fiction was growing within the New Testament itself; how, from St. Paul who did not mention the empty tomb in his epistles (the oldest texts of the New Testament), the evangelist Mark did mention it but only with a ‘young man’. Matthew, who wrote…

Continue reading

How the myth developed

Next to the already empty tomb, this Italian work by Andrea Orcagna (1370, preserved in the National Gallery of London) shows a dialogue between a couple of angels and the three Marys. In the earliest gospel, Mark (16:5) describes that the women enter the tomb and meet ‘one young man’. A later evangelist, Matthew (28:2),…

Continue reading