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Semitic OS in the Observer

Last week I said: What nationalists do is keep their parents’ Operating System (OS) and try to add racialist or reactionary programs to it. Such a naive strategy won’t work. We need a real Nietzschean transvaluation, the most radical operation of the mind I can think of: substituting an OS with another one (again, cf.…

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I’m still alone

One of the things that strike me when I say that I am speaking to myself is that some respond that they are listening to me, or that they have learned about anti-Christian matters thanks to this site. The reality is that that would be only one aspect of being accompanied. A few days ago…

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Physiognomy

The Greeks, and particularly the Spartans, studied ‘physiognomy’ to interpret the character, personality, and ultimately the soul of an individual based on physical features, especially of the face to the point that ugliness in certain Greek states was practically a curse. It was also believed that beauty and a willingness of the features should be…

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Great personalities defend eugenics, 2

by Evropa Soberana Antiquity With the de-barbarization that ensued after the emergence of a sedentary lifestyle, the people soon realised that a society uprooted from Nature immediately degenerates. In short, humanity woke up to the dangers of civilisation. To compensate for it, the leaders of these societies set up processes aimed at counteracting the pernicious…

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Darkening Age, 7

Yesterday I said that in the third volume of the series Christianity’s Criminal History, ‘The Ancient Church: Forgery, Brainwashing, Exploitation, Annihilation’, Deschner argues that the tales of Christian martyrs in early Christianity were grossly exaggerated, and that I planned in the future to translate some passages of it. But the impatient English reader can go…

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Heisman’s suicide note, 3

Rupture: How Christ hijacked the moral compass of the West The English word “virtue” is derived from the Roman word virtus, meaning manliness or strength. Virtus derived from vir, meaning “man”. Virilis, an ancestor of the English word “virile”, is also derived from the Roman word for man. From this Roman conception of virtue, was…

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