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The Name of the Rose

In his latest piece, published today, Ricardo Duchesne says that ‘the Western ideals of individualism, egalitarianism, and moral universalism are the ultimate causes’ of white suicide. But again, he doesn’t mention that Christianity exacerbated individualism, egalitarianism, and moral universalism. (The doctrine that your soul must be saved from eternal fire infinitely exacerbated the individualism of the white race.) But I didn’t want to focus on Duchesne.

These days I watched the miniseries they made last year about the novel The Name of the Rose, authored by the Italian Umberto Eco. Naively, I acquired the DVDs expecting that the Italian Giacomo Battiato would respect his countryman’s masterpiece. To my surprise, Battiato did the same thing they did in the 1986 film, in which Sean Connery plays the wise Franciscan monk William of Baskerville: they both saved the girl who, in Eco’s novel, is sent to the stake by an Inquisitor. But the recent television series is much worse, as it invents female characters, brave warriors of course, who do not appear in either Eco’s novel or the 1986 Hollywood adaptation.

It is really a scandal that the film industry continues to betray one of the very few masterpieces in literature of the last decades (here on this site I also have promoted the reading of Julian by Gore Vidal).

Even though I don’t recommend the 1986 adaptation, much less last year’s miniseries, seeing the latter these days reminded me of something I have already said on this site about a passage in The Name of the Rose: precisely what white advocates like Duchesne will never dare to see.