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Lord Snow

‘Lord Snow’ is the third episode of the first season of the HBO medieval fantasy television series Game of Thrones. It first aired on May 1, 2011. The bad message of this episode begins when Ned Stark discovers, already settled in King’s Landing, that his little daughter Arya has a real weapon.

Ned Stark: ‘This is not a toy. Little ladies shouldn’t play with swords’.

Arya: ‘I wasn’t playing. And I don’t want to be a lady’.

Keeping in mind the medieval literature of my mother tongue, there was nothing like it in Spain despite the fact that its literature flourished with stories of medieval warriors. This dialogue in ‘Lord Snow’ is a pure invention of our time. (I have said elsewhere that the film that started this reversal of roles, that a saving warrior could be a woman, was the 1979 Alien.)

Very kindly Ned tries to reason with his daughter in her room, asking Arya if she remembers the House Stark motto, ‘Winter is coming’. He makes Arya see that she was born in the middle of a long summer (in George R.R. Martin’s universe summers can last for years, and dreaded winters too). Ned wants to show his daughter that she hasn’t yet known the harshness of life.

Contemporary Americans are like Arya in the sense that they haven’t suffered those long winters: the thirty to one hundred years that, according to Revilo Oliver, we must endure to bring about a true psychogenic change. This could even be said of all contemporary Westerners who require a long winter to generate the gravitas to form a new nation. Fortunately, what the Europeans have suffered will soon begin to be suffered by the Americans. On page 131 of Toward the White Republic the American Michael O’Meara said:

Qualitatively more persuasive, though, is Orlov’s claim that the Soviet Union was better situated than the United States to endure and recover from a political-economic breakdown. In his view, Americans see their ‘spendthrift debtor nation’ as a ‘land of free ice cream and perpetual sunshine’. Never having experienced invasion, world war, famine, or bloody dictatorship, it’s hard for them to imagine a future unlike their past. More than Russians, Americans have been severed from their past and redesigned as gratification-oriented consumers whose defining character is materialist rather than ethnic, historical, or cultural. They also lack the psychology of resilience ‘bred’ into the long-suffering Russians. Finally, they are more ideologically deluded by the system’s pretences, just as they are more integrated into its increasingly dysfunctional institutions.

In Winterfell the boy Bran has awakened from his coma. In the novel this is due to the telepathic intervention of Bloodraven, a man fused to a weirwood tree (see the weiwrood trees on the sidebar) who had appeared to the comatose Bran in a dream as a three-eyed raven, thanks to ancient magic on the other side of the Wall.

Old Nan, the caretaker of the now crippled Bran, for the first time in the series talks about the legends about what long time ago had been a winter that lasted a whole generation. (The actress who played Old Nan died before ‘Lord Snow’ was released. The episode is dedicated to her memory in the end credits.) Old Nan speaks to Bran about the White Walkers who had been a scourge to mankind during the long winter, so the Wall was built millennia ago in order to keep them at bay.

On the other side of the kingdom King Robert remembers with the members of his Kingsguard their first killings. The masculine dialogue reminds me, once again, of today’s feminised western men. Who among the so-called defenders of the West on the internet has killed someone? If there is something that distinguishes us from women it is our passion to kill, and without manhood there is neither war nor white republic. (This said, I recognise it’s impossible to kill since WW-II as our governments are anti-white and there are no good wars to fight.)

King Robert recounts that during a war he fell from his horse and a young soldier charged at him, receiving him with a hammer blow that broke all of his ribs. Jaime Lannister and another member of the Kingsguard tell the king who their first victims were.

Having won the Allies we can no longer have this kind of dialogue. And together with tolerating that, the System has even taken women away from us through feminism: a sign of the mental state of the white man. Only if Hitler had won would we be telling ourselves who our first victims were.

And speaking of feminism and would-be warriors, the episode closes precisely with the reversal of sexual roles. Upon learning that Arya doesn’t want to become a lady but rather wants to be a swordsman, Ned hires Syrio Forel to teach her the art of handling her Needle. In the first lesson Forel tells the girl Arya:

‘You are late, boy’.

That, and not the last season that angered the toxic fandom so much, should have triggered the rage of viewers. But whites are bananas. When a man accepts these inversions he is accepting masturbation as a substitute for those women who (like Arya) aren’t going to marry. The betrayal doesn’t come from the woman but from the Aryan male (women only follow the strong, and the strong one today is the anti-white System).

Within the cultural revolution that has been unfolding in the West for a few decades, critics of Game of Thrones have praised Maisie Williams for her portrayal of Arya Stark and her sword lesson scenes. The whites among these ‘critics’ represent the worst scum Western history has produced. But the havoc that the long winter ahead will cause will also wipe out all degeneracy of America’s summer (actually, historically it’s already autumn).

The episode ends with Arya training with Forel and Ned Stark watching them. The scene is paradigmatic of the bad messages of Game of Thrones as Ned was the character considered, by the toxic fandom, as the most honourable man of the 2011-2019 series.