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The bear and the maiden fair

‘The Bear and the Maiden Fair’ is the seventh episode of the third season of HBO’s fantasy television series Game of Thrones, and the 27th episode of the series overall. The episode was written by George R. R. Martin, the feminist author of the A Song of Ice and Fire novels on which the series is based, and was directed by a woman, Michelle MacLaren.

The group of wildlings just crossed the Wall and we heard the first bad message from Ygritte’s mouth: ‘You know nothing, Jon Snow’. Unlike others on the expedition, Ygritte just crossed the Wall for the first time in her life. It’s she who hasn’t seen the world, not even a single stone building, since north of the Wall there are only huts. A moment before Ygritte didn’t understand why the southern armies need drums and those who fly the banners. But although she is ignorant, her mocking gestures suggest that Jon, who was raised in a castle south of the Wall, is the ignorant one.

Then we see, in the Riverlands, a love scene between Robb and non-white buttocks. The female director dared to show off Robb’s wife’s buttocks in a presumably aesthetic shot in King Robb’s candle-lit military tent. The camera changes places and we see a shot from above of the naked woman, who is face down, once more showing us her buttocks.

Rob: (Sigh) ‘If you don’t put some clothes on, I can’t promise I won’t attack you [sexually] again’.

These scenes make me want to see what will happen to the bicolour couple in episode 29, where the accounts are settled. But for the moment the director shows us a long scene and then Robb says, looking at the map of his military strategy although distracted by the exposed buttocks of his wife: ‘How am I supposed to sit here planning a war when you’re over there, looking like that [naked face down]?’

The woman seems unconcerned about the war. She writes a letter to her mom and asks the king when he will take her to her hometown. But as always: the failure doesn’t come from women like this director, but from writers like Martin and the culture that allowed Jews and women to come to Hollywood. Then non-white buttocks tells him that she is pregnant and Robb is surprised. ‘You’re my queen’ says the idiot (in later seasons we’ll see that Jon uses the exact same phrase with Dany).

It is embarrassing to quote the dialogues between non-white buttocks and her husband. Instead of preparing for battle, Robb finds himself in the middle of a long honeymoon with his non-white wife. The mere fact of taking her to the military camp is insanity, and it isn’t surprising in a later episode that Roose Bolton confessed that Robb’s ignoring him when Roose was his military adviser contributed to betraying him to the Lannisters. One more shot from the ceiling filmed by the female director shows this woman’s buttocks again before Robb, already dressed, pounces on her again.

We then see a surreal dialogue between Ygritte and the warg Orell, probably the most important element of the wildling expedition south of the Wall due to his out-of-body abilities. The surreal thing is that, as I have already said, in the real world an outsider like Jon would never have access to the buttocks of a beautiful woman from a tribe. But except Orell, here the ‘tribe’ is behaving with Jon’s relationship with Ygritte as if tribal mores were those of Murka: an astronomical projection of present feminism to a medieval era that never existed.

So here we have a double bad message in a script written by Martin himself and directed by a liberated woman: a cute woman going to war as if she were a common soldier, and with all the sexual freedoms of a contemporary Western woman, including freedom of choosing an outsider instead of a member of her tribe, like Orell. The stupidity of Game of Thrones fans not to report these things is limitless. But in the darkest hour of the West these things are the bread and butter.

Another bad message is that Murka’s central values—social justice warring—are projected back to a fantastic medieval era. Dany arrives with her mulatto army and her two white guardians outside Yunkai, where there are 200,000 slaves. Jorah advises her not to invade the walled city as that campaign won’t bring her closer to the Iron Throne, which is where Dany wants to go. The girl responds to her counsellor that she has 200,000 reasons to take it.

Naturally, in medieval times no one fought wars in which a king could lose half his army just to free the slaves of a distant and exotic culture. But here we got a SJW queen! I have barely read A Song of Ice and Fire but the fact that these novels have become bestsellers speaks ill of the readers. Let’s just imagine what the West would be like if, instead of Martin’s novels, they had William Pierce’s first novel as their biggest bestseller. But the bad messages don’t end there.

In King’s Landing we see an absurd discussion between Tyron and his whore, which would be sad even to cite because in this TV series men are infinitely more idiots than they have been in the historical past (although not in the present). All I can say is that if I were Tyrion I would have already sent Shae to Volantis: her hometown where, by the way, Robb’s wife also comes from. Yes, non-white buttocks and Shae have something else in common besides their hometown: they’re light-brown skinned.

As if those bad messages weren’t enough, in the Riverlands Arya escapes from the cave in front of the entire Brotherhood, and although they run after her they don’t reach her, which suggests that the girl runs faster than the soldiers. Then we see another anti-male scene, although here the message is more than direct. Before castrating Theon (remember that Ramsay has him in a torture chamber), he puts two stunning young women in the chamber, both telling him that they want to see his penis. Then the attractive women get naked and things happen before the castration.

Another feminist scene: Jon tells Ygritte that a deer she wants to hunt with her bow is too far away but Ygritte hunts it. The scene is somewhat reminiscent of that scene from the first episode of the first season, in which Arya hits a perfect target with her bow after her older brother, Bran, terribly missed the target. Reality reversals are ubiquitous in this series.

Then Ygritte continues to taunt Jon, even though she confessed to Orell that she loved Jon. An absurd love: as absurd as Robb’s with Talisa and Tyrion with Shae. Seeing these romantic scenes filmed by a woman, produced by Jews and written by a traitorous white man only humiliates the male viewer. But these idiots play romantic music when Ygritte kisses Jon on his mouth.

‘The Bear and the Maiden Fair’ ends with another unreal scene between a man and a woman. Jaime Lannister throws himself into the ring where Locke had planned to kill Brienne with a huge bear, as if in real life the heir to Casterly Rock, the ancient stronghold of House Lannister, could dare to risk his life to save a woman. The whole scene exudes unreality, and it was this scene that gave the episode its title.