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Christianity’s Criminal History, 166

The butcher of the Saxons While Charles was making his conquests in northern Spain and losing them again—the only defeat suffered by a Frankish army under his command—Widukind, a Westphalian nobleman who had returned from Danish emigration (and who is first named in 777, when he failed to attend the Diet of Paderborn), advanced with…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 164

The Christian banners enter Saxony Charles’ armies—which in the larger campaigns consisted of just 3,000 horsemen and between 6,000 and 10,000-foot soldiers—sometimes numbered more than 5,000 or 6,000 warriors. Unlike in the time of his grandfather Charles Martell, the core of the army was made up of heavy cavalry. The horsemen were armed with chain…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 163

– For the context of these translations click here –   Plunder and Christianisation, a trump card of Frankish government policy While the Franks had fought in unison with the Saxons in the annihilation of the kingdom of Thuringia in 531, in 555-556 Chlothar I conducted two campaigns against them. In the first he succumbed…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 161

– For the context of these translations click here – Anti-juridical sovereignty of Charles and the beginning of the pro-pope warfare Shortly before Pope Stephen died at the end of January 772, Carloman had died (after having made large donations to churches and monasteries, and especially to the cathedral of Rheims and the abbey of…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 160

– For the context of these translations click here –   Criminal excesses at the papal court with the change of power in the Frankish kingdom Pope Stephen II, who at the decisive moment had generously granted himself the ‘Constantinian Donation’, died on 26 April 757. At his death, he left a considerably large territory,…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 157

  The formation of the Church-State by wars and pillage ‘But be vigilant, my children, strive earnestly to take part in what we desire! For you know that he who is on the other side will be excluded from eternal life’. —Pope Stephen II ‘The struggle for Christ and the Church is assigned to the…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 152

  St Boniface, ‘Apostle of the Germans’ and of Rome The Greatest Englishman. —Title of an anthology by Timothy Reuter ‘He was an utterly devoted person, one might almost say tender, not a tempestuous personality or a force of nature. A man of utterly pure and lofty idealism’. —Wilhelm Neuss ‘Moreover, any historian—including an atheist—should…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 148

– For the context of these translations click here –   St. Gregory of Tours (Louvre) When we read the History of the Franks, as amorphous as it is detailed, by Gregory of Tours, which is the main source of that period, we are surprised that the same head in which such a grotesque belief…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 146

  The Church in the Merovingian Period ‘The Frankish reign of the Merovingians… was an age bathed in blood and murder, full of the most dreadful tragedies, at the same time replete with believing zeal and holiness’. —Franz Zach, Catholic ‘No one in history ever founded so many monasteries again…’ —P. Lasko ‘… a bloody…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 144

  The fall of Brunhilda and the first peak in the Christianisation of the idea of kingship (Left, pen drawing from the earliest manuscript of the Chronicle of Fredegar which is believed to depict Eusebius and Jerome, 715 AD.) On the death of Childebert II, he was succeeded by his two sons: Theudebert II (595-612)…

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