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Christianity’s Criminal History, 169

Charlemagne’s bloody laws During his struggle, the king issued draconian laws, evidently whenever he believed that he had finally subdued the Saxons and could bring them to ‘order.’ Notable in this respect are the Capitulatio departibus Saxoniae (782) and the Capitulare Saxonicum (797). And as conversions to Christianity were forced by mass baptisms, while the…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 168

Frankish expansion from 481 to 814   Last uprisings, war of annihilation and ‘the serene height of the staff’ The war of the Saxons, which lasted for more than ten years, didn’t, however, affect the foreign sovereignty of the Franks, or even Christianity as such. Rather, it was directed primarily against their representatives and institutions,…

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How Yahweh conquered Rome, 3

Jews in Rome before the Jewish Wars Long before it was repackaged for the Gentiles, the Big Lie was a Jewish self-delusion. As I have detailed at the end of my long article ‘Zionism, Crypto-Judaism and the Biblical Hoax,’ in the sixth and the fifth century BC in Babylon, a priestly elite from Jerusalem decided…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 166

The butcher of the Saxons While Charles was making his conquests in northern Spain and losing them again—the only defeat suffered by a Frankish army under his command—Widukind, a Westphalian nobleman who had returned from Danish emigration (and who is first named in 777, when he failed to attend the Diet of Paderborn), advanced with…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 164

The Christian banners enter Saxony Charles’ armies—which in the larger campaigns consisted of just 3,000 horsemen and between 6,000 and 10,000-foot soldiers—sometimes numbered more than 5,000 or 6,000 warriors. Unlike in the time of his grandfather Charles Martell, the core of the army was made up of heavy cavalry. The horsemen were armed with chain…

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Mexico’s independence

Editor’s note: The war of Mexican independence from Spain began on 16 September 1810, when an ethnic Jew, Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, uttered the so-called ‘Cry of Dolores’, stirring up the Indians against the Spaniards. The Breve Historia de México, which José Vasconcelos wrote in 1936, runs on a premise: as long as a civilisation…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 161

– For the context of these translations click here – Anti-juridical sovereignty of Charles and the beginning of the pro-pope warfare Shortly before Pope Stephen died at the end of January 772, Carloman had died (after having made large donations to churches and monasteries, and especially to the cathedral of Rheims and the abbey of…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 160

– For the context of these translations click here –   Criminal excesses at the papal court with the change of power in the Frankish kingdom Pope Stephen II, who at the decisive moment had generously granted himself the ‘Constantinian Donation’, died on 26 April 757. At his death, he left a considerably large territory,…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 157

  The formation of the Church-State by wars and pillage ‘But be vigilant, my children, strive earnestly to take part in what we desire! For you know that he who is on the other side will be excluded from eternal life’. —Pope Stephen II ‘The struggle for Christ and the Church is assigned to the…

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Christianity’s Criminal History, 156

  The papal revolution fails The mass of the clergy naturally knew that their power rested above all on the magic of the cause, on the beautiful appearance, on the outward and sensible charm of religious services; therefore they had to stand by the people, who venerated the sacred images.   ______ 卐 ______  …

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